Retroactive Child Support: Should you be Worried?

The recent Supreme Court of Canada decision, Michel v Graydon, 2020 SCC 24  is likely going to cause late night anxiety for some parents as the Court determined that, no matter how old the “children” are, parents may still collect unpaid child support from the other parent.  

In Michel v Graydon, the Court unanimously ruled that a British Columbia father must pay $23,000 in retroactive child support to his former common-law partner and child, even though the “child” is now 29 years old.

The Court held that child support is a right that belongs to the child, it is not something that parents can negotiate away. Child support should provide the child with the same standard of living they had prior to parental separation. Payments required of a parent must be reasonable when taking payor income into account. Back payment orders, or retroactive child support orders, hold parents accountable to responsibilities they may have neglected.

The judges in Michel v Graydon unanimously agreed that the prevention of retroactive child support places a disproportionate burden on women as caregivers. The Court further noted it would be wrong to create an incentive by granting payor parents immunity after the child ceases to be “a child of the marriage”.

“The courtroom doors should not be closed because certain categories of debt owed to children are classified as coming too late”.

The Supreme Court was clear in their message to parents who knowingly avoid or diminish their child support obligations, payor parents will no longer profit from bad behaviour.

Should you have any further question about collecting retroactive child support, or need advice on your family law matter, please contact Robertson Stromberg LLP.

 

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Articles & Research Retroactive Child Support: Should you be Worried?