12 Lawyers from Robertson Stromberg recognized in the 16th Edition of The Best Lawyers in Canada

For over 100 years, Robertson Stromberg has been delivering pragmatic advice and strategic solutions in every area of the law. As a top local law firm with reach that extends nationally, we strive for excellence and live by the highest professional standards.  

Congratulations to our lawyers who have been recognized in the 16th Edition of The Best Lawyers in Canada. Best Lawyers is the oldest and most respected peer review publication in the legal profession. Recognition in Best Lawyers is widely regarded by both clients and legal professionals as a significant honour, conferred on a lawyer by his or her peers. 

Related News and Articles

Tiffany M Paulsen receives Q.Arb designation

Congratulations to Tiffany M. Paulsen, Q.C., on achieving Q.Arb designation from the ADR Institute of Canada (ADRIC). ADRIC is Canada's preeminent self-regulatory professional Dispute Resolution organization. It provides education and certification, promotes ethical...

read more

Jennifer D. Pereira, Q.C. and Sean M. Sinclair recognized as Benchmark Litigation Future Stars

Jennifer D. Pereira, Q.C. and Sean M. Sinclair have been recognized as Benchmark Litigation Future Stars!

Benchmark Litigation is the definitive guide to the leading litigation law firms and lawyers around the world.

Research is conducted through extensive interviews with litigators, dispute resolution specialists and their clients to identify the leading litigators and firms.

Congratulations, Jennifer and Sean!

Webinar – Objections Cheat Sheet (CPD 292)

The ability to quickly object to an improper question at a questioning or trial is an important skill for any litigator to have. An Objections Cheat Sheet is meant to summarize the grounds and rationale for the most common objections and their accompanying exceptions.

Created by the litigation team at Robertson Stromberg LLP, the Cheat Sheet is largely based on the Trial Objections Cheat Sheet produced and maintained by Thomas Reuters with a targeted analysis on Saskatchewan case law.

Join Jennifer Pereira, Q.C., for this informative webinar as she addresses common objections and the corresponding rules, case law and exceptions for our province.

January 19 (Online) | 12:00 – 1:00 PM

Qualifies for 1 CPD Hour

Register here.

Saskatchewan Introduces Binding Pre-Trial Conferences

The Saskatchewan Court of Queen’s Bench has amended its Rules of Court to provide for Binding Pre-Trial conferences. Typically, pre-trial conferences provide an informal setting for all parties to a civil or family law matter and a Justice of the Court of Queen’s Bench to:

  • identify the facts that are agreed upon or are in dispute;
  • clarify the issues between the parties; and
  • attempt to reach a resolution by way of a voluntary agreement.

With the recent amendment to Saskatchewan’s Rules of Court, parties can now request a binding pre-trial conference at the close of pleadings and when all parties consent.

According to Rule 4-21.2 (2) binding pre-trial conferences are not intended to replace normal negotiations between the parties. The goals of binding pre-trial conferences are to allow the parties to participate in the problem-solving process; to allow settlement options to be presented; and if settlement fails to obtain a biding decision on one or more of the claims or issues in the dispute so as to improve the efficiency of the court system and to save time and costs for all parties.

Following a binding pre-trial conference, the Justice will render a final and binding decision after hearing from both sides if the parties cannot reach their own agreement. The decision cannot be appealed.

The written agreement to participate in a binding pre-trial conference requires the parties to acknowledge and confirm that they have entered into the agreement voluntarily, that they understand the nature and affect of the agreement, that they understand and consent to participating in the binding pre-trial conference process including that, if the parties are unable to reach a settlement, the presiding judge may make a binding decision that may include costs. The agreement will further specify that the parties understand and agree that a binding decision will be deemed a consent order or judgment of the court and cannot be appealed without leave of the presiding judge pursuant to section 38 of the Queen’s Bench Act.

Another difference between binding pre-trial conferences and regular procedure relates to timing of material filing. Binding pre-trial conferences require each party to file pre-trial briefs and expert reports not later than 15 days before the date scheduled for the binding pre-trial conference.

A party may withdraw consent from participating in a binding pre-trial conference up to 10 days before the scheduled meeting.

The introduction of binding pre-trial conferences in Saskatchewan offers litigants an additional tool to resolve disputes without the necessity of trial. Although Saskatchewan is not the first jurisdiction in Canada to offer binding pre-trial conferences, it is certainly at the forefront of this alternative dispute resolution mechanism.

Lawyers from Robertson Stromberg recognized in 15th edition of The Best Lawyers in Canada.

Robertson Stromberg is proud to announce the selection of Misty S. Alexandre, Christopher J.H. Donald, Gary D. Young, Allan M. Haubrich, Jared D. Epp, Leslie W. Prosser, Jennifer D. Pereira, Tiffany M Paulsen and Kenneth K.E. Ziegler, by our peers, for inclusion in the 15th edition of The Best Lawyers in Canada.

Best Lawyers is the oldest and most respected peer review publication in the legal profession, and recognition in Best Lawyers is widely regarded by both clients and legal professionals as a significant honour, conferred on a lawyer by his or her peers. Congratulations!

Insurance Companies Cannot Compel Customers to Undergo Genetic Testing

In a recent Reference re Genetic Non-Discrimination Act, 2020 SCC 17, the Supreme Court of Canada upheld a federal law that forbids companies from making people undergo genetic testing before buying insurance or other services.

The Genetic Non-Discrimination Act (the Act) also outlaws the practice of requiring the disclosure of existing genetic test results as a condition for obtaining such services or entering into a contract.

The act is intended to ensure Canadians can take genetic tests to help identify health risks without fear that the results will pose a disadvantage when seeking life or health insurance.

In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court held that the measures are a valid exercise of Parliament’s power over criminal law set out in the Constitution.

Penalties for violating the provisions of the Act include a fine of up to $1 million and five years in prison.

This case came to the Supreme Court as an appeal from a provincial “reference.” References are questions that governments ask courts for their opinion on. Reference re Genetic Non-Discrimination Act began as a reference to the Quebec Court of Appeal by the Quebec government.

For more information, contact Jennifer D. Pereira, Q.C. at j.pereira@rslaw.com

LawyersJennifer D Pereira